The little-told story of how the U.S. government poisoned alcohol during Prohibition. – Slate Magazine

Never trust content from do-gooders in government, where it’s ok to lie or even promote or pursue, poverty, destruction and even death for purposes one (or the group pursuing whichever agenda it wishes to impose on others through coercion by government) considers to be good, even if others don’t agree.

Doctors were accustomed to alcohol poisoning by then, the routine of life in the Prohibition era. The bootlegged whiskies and so-called gins often made people sick. The liquor produced in hidden stills frequently came tainted with metals and other impurities. But this outbreak was bizarrely different. The deaths, as investigators would shortly realize, came courtesy of the U.S. government.

Frustrated that people continued to consume so much alcohol even after it was banned, federal officials had decided to try a different kind of enforcement. They ordered the poisoning of industrial alcohols manufactured in the United States, products regularly stolen by bootleggers and resold as drinkable spirits. The idea was to scare people into giving up illicit drinking. Instead, by the time Prohibition ended in 1933, the federal poisoning program, by some estimates, had killed at least 10,000 people.

via The little-told story of how the U.S. government poisoned alcohol during Prohibition. – Slate Magazine.

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.